Presentation Topics

2014 Presentation Topics

Click presenter’s name to view presentation abstract.

Francis Gouillart: Getting to a Trillion Sensors: Why MEMS Engineers Have to Become Ecosystem Co-creators

Anna Rissanen: MEMS Microspectrometers – Powering New Sensing Applications

Manas Gartia: MoboSens -Smartphone Micro Sensor for Accurate and Quantitative Environmental Water Analysis

Pek Lum: Tracking the State of Disease Using Mobile Devices

Nate Kube: Security Imperative: How to Build Stronger Security Requirements into the Design Phase of Product Development

 

 

Francis Gouillart: Getting to a Trillion Sensors: Why MEMS Engineers Have to Become Ecosystem Co-creators

In this session, Francis Gouillart will show how the co-creation model he developed with some of his colleagues at the University of Michigan can be used to encourage the formation of a powerful, MEMS-based ecosystem, using agriculture as the case in point.   Co-creation is a theory on how business ecosystems form and “lock-in” when a compelling platform starts crystallizing a community of players around the ability to create significant value together. Using his vast experience of working with many leading agricultural companies around the world over the last 30 years, Francis will draw lessons of why precision agriculture has only enjoyed limited success so far and why co-creation holds the promise of opening up the field to massive use of sensor-based technologies. 

Beyond the industry-wide prescription, he will outline the nature of the transformation required of engineers in MEMS firms to move from the classic process- and product-driven development paradigm to one where they actively engage communities of developers and users in a joint platform- and data-driven development effort. He will show how MEMS companies working with technically-savvy lead users such as progressive farmers and a small number of agricultural equipment, seed and agricultural chemical companies, can develop a common engagement platform that will spawn an entire MEMS-based agriculture ecosystem.

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Anna Rissanen: MEMS Microspectrometers – Powering New Sensing Applications

Microspectrometers are creating a wave of new emerging applications based on MEMS sensor technology – these small, robust and light-weight devices have found their way into medical-, automotive- and space instruments as well as environmental analysis. VTT’s optical MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs) are tunable optical filters, which enable miniaturization of spectrometers into small, mass producible low-cost sensors with versatile measurement capabilities; spectral fingerprinting can be used to identify and analyse various features, materials and gases in a non-contact, selective manner. MEMS technologies have been developed for wavelengths ranging from UV to thermal IR and applied to novel compact hydrocarbon sensors, thermal infrared gas analysers and NIR automotive fuel quality sensing. Available wavelengths enable also customized hand-held instruments aimed for example for process-control and food safety. With large optical apertures, FPI technology has also created a basis for various hyperspectral imaging instruments, with attractive combination of spectral – and spatial data. Application demonstrations range from light-weight spectral imagers in nanosatellite space missions to environmental gas sensing in unmanned aerial vehicles and precision agriculture applications, as well as for medical instruments for skin cancer analysis. Volume production capability of MEMS enables emerging potential for spectral imaging devices in consumer wellness and wearable devices.

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Manas Gartia: MoboSens -Smartphone Micro Sensor for Accurate and Quantitative Environmental Water Analysis

Many substances in water and soil are difficult to measure without access to expensive equipment and advanced training. Knowledge of these substances and their spatial concentration remains a barrier to effective policy and mitigation strategies to reduce environmental impacts and support sustainability. For example, excess nitrate from agricultural fertilizer and municipal waste contributes to eutrophication, drinking water toxicity, soil acidification, and climate change. Determining how non-point source pollution like nitrate migrates through the environment remains a labor and technology intensive task. MoboSens is a smart-phone based sensor which allows anyone with a smart phone to perform chemical analysis. By placing a single drop of sample on the sensor, the program will scan the sample for contaminants such as nitrate. Combined with GPS and mobile broadband, sensing results with geospatial information are uploaded to the Cloud where more value-added services are provided. With that service, MoboSens becomes an agriculture assisting tool and a citizen-participatory environment protection platform. This platform will be appropriate for individuals lacking formal scientific training and/or access to expensive laboratory equipment, as well as those skilled scientists in need of a field-operable, real-time alternative to traditional laboratory equipment.

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Pek Lum: Tracking the State of Disease Using Mobile Devices

Smart phones are increasingly being used to track many aspects of our lives, from our geo-locations to our buying habits. Personal wearable devices are getting more popular as a way to track health and sleep activities. More recently, mobile devices are being tested as a way to track patient health. The Michael J. Fox Foundation has made available accelerometer and gyroscopic data collected from smart phones used by subjects with Parkinson’s disease and by healthy controls. We applied Ayasdi’s topological approach to this dataset and showed that data collected from smart phones can differentiate between subjects with Parkinson’s disease and healthy controls. We also showed that there were two patient sub-groups of Parkinson’s patients as defined by the data collected from the smart phones. Although still preliminary, these results show the potential of smart phones or wearable devices as a way to track patient health in near real time.

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Nate Kube: Security Imperative: How to Build Stronger Security Requirements into the Design Phase of Product Development

Traditionally, finishing development on a tight schedule in order to meet a market window has motivated product development.  Too often in this quest, security requirements have been glossed over and in some cases overlooked in exchange for speed.  Yet that speed is often compromised when a security flaw is discovered during QA testing or worse yet, when it is discovered in the field where the cost of a recall grows exponentially higher. Companies cannot afford these mishaps and must adapt their methods to properly include security in the design phase.

In this session, Nate Kube will discuss a process that device manufacturers can take to assess their practices and ensure the inclusion of stronger security measures in the development lifecycle. This approach has been adopted across several industries in order to better produce high quality and secure products.

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